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Used Steinway & Sons Model B

“STEINWAY MODEL B GRAND PIANOS COMBINE STEINWAY’S LEGENDARY QUALITY INTO A TRULY AMAZING AND VERSATILE INSTRUMENT. THESE RESPECTED ‘MUSIC ROOM GRAND’ PIANOS ARE A WONDERFUL MIX OF VISUAL BEAUTY AND TRUE MUSICALITY THAT IS EXTREMELY DIFFICULT TO BEAT.”

The Steinway Model B is often called “the perfect piano” and for good reason. It is considered a near perfect blend of size, power and overall versatility making this instrument a solid choice for anywhere from an intimate setting, a teaching studio or a huge concert venue. Larger than a Model S, M, L, or A, Model B grand pianos command a powerful presence. Introduced in 1878, these pianos have been in constant production at both the New York and Hamburg Steinway Factories.

This particular Steinway & Sons model B piano in satin ebony finish was purchased new and was very lightly used. Hammers and dampers show little to now wear, action parts still perform like new. Soundboard in flawless condition, as are the strings.

Piano was meticulously maintained since first delivered. We have completely inspected the piano with our piano technician, and we are including a 5 year parts and labour warranty.

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Julliard’s Practice rooms continue a Steinway grand tradition!

NEW YORK, NY – At the House of Juilliard in the heart of historic Lincoln Center resides one of the world’s largest inventories of Steinway & Sons pianos: Steinways on concert stages, in practice rooms, faculty studios, classrooms and dance studios.

Chief Piano Technician Mario Igrec said the school owns approximately 260 pianos – 248 are Steinways and 231 of those are Steinway grands. That grand collection includes 10 Model D’s, 63 Model B’s, 5 Model A’s, 98 Model L’s, 42 Model O’s, 12 Model M’s and one Model S.

The New York piano maker’s relationship goes back to 1924 and the founding of the Juilliard Graduate School. According to The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music, the school fulfilled last wishes of Augustus D. Juilliard, a wealthy textile merchant who left about $20 million for deserving music students to further their education. Two years later, the Graduate School merged with the Institute of Musical Art to become the Juilliard School of Music. The Institute opened its doors in 1905 under Frank Damrosch, godson of Franz Liszt and head of music education for New York City.

“The partnership between Juilliard and Steinway has been mutually beneficial since both institutions are synonymous with quality,” said Dr. Yoheved (Veda) Kaplinsky, who chairs the piano department and serves as artistic director for Juilliard’s prestigious pre-college piano program. “We both share the ideals of bringing the utmost artistry to the stage, which always requires a collaboration of performer and instrument. Having an instrument with unlimited potential always inspires artists to achieve more.”

“We both share the ideals of bringing the utmost artistry to the stage, which always requires a collaboration of performer and instrument.”

Steinway Artist Murray Perahia gave a master class at Juilliard on October 12, 2017.
Juilliard faculty member, Pre-College piano alumnus and Steinway Artist Emanuel Ax performs at Juilliard’s Pre-College Centennial Gala.
Ingenuity, innovation and imagination come to life on the keys of Steinway pianos behind the many windows of Juilliard. Photo by Chris Cooper

“We both share the ideals of bringing the utmost artistry to the stage, which always requires a collaboration of performer and instrument.”

When Dr. Kaplinsky was growing up in Israel in the 1960s, Juilliard was the symbol of excellence in music education and Steinway was the symbol of excellence in pianos. “My personal relationship with Steinway resulted in my owning two Steinway pianos,” she said. “At its’ best, Steinway is an incomparable product with an incredibly rich sound and great possibilities for nuance. They still remain a favorite among most performers and students.”

 

“Steinway & Sons and The Juilliard School have grown together as cultural mainstays in New York and around the world for more than 90 years,” said Steinway CEO Ron Losby. “From my time studying there, I developed a great passion for music and complete respect for their tradition of excellence in the performing arts. I hold the Juilliard experience close to my heart each and every day.”

Working with Karen Beluso, Steinway’s institutional sales manager of Greater New York, Juilliard has systematically added 14 New York Steinway Model O grands to its practice rooms, where pianos are played incessantly.

“New Steinway pianos in the practice rooms represent a significant development for any young pianist,” said Dr. Beluso, who studied exclusively at Juilliard and holds a doctorate in musical arts. She made her orchestral debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the age of 12 and debuted at Carnegie Hall performing Chopin’s Piano Concerto Number 2 with the New York Youth Symphony.

Karen Beluso, Institutional Sales Manager, Greater New York.

“Having an excellent piano in the practice room is inspiring. Inferior pianos lead to frustration which limits their growth.”

“The quality of the pianos the students use to practice is of paramount importance for their ability to develop technical control and a sound esthetic that will eventually define their artistic personality,” observes Dr. Kaplinsky. “Having an excellent piano in the practice room is inspiring. Inferior pianos lead to frustration which limits their growth.”

To get the most from each practice session, she advises students to listen and focus. “Mechanical practicing is the enemy of artistry and imagination. Befriend the piano and create conversations where every word an note is meaningful. The students’ attitude about practicing is largely determined by their relationship to the instrument. It is rare today that we hear excuses at lessons that are based on blaming the practice rooms. The main complaints we hear today are that there aren’t enough of them,” she said. Juilliard operates 74 practice rooms with pianos in Lincoln Center and another 13 rooms with pianos in the Meredith Willson Residence Hall.

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March Highlights from the Spirio Catalog

MARCH 2019

spirio SPOTLIGHT

AN ARETHA FRANKLIN TRIBUTE, TRANSCENDENTAL ETUDES, DAVID BOWIE RE-ARRANGED, AND A BIT OF BOLLYWOOD

STEINWAY & SONS SPIRIO, the world’s finest high resolution player piano, features a musical tribute to Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, from the Prince of New Orleans, Davell Crawford.

Aretha Franklin’s special place in pop music as a pioneer and an influencer is undeniable. The emotion she brought to a diverse group of signature tunes is evoked by Davell Crawford in a set of arrangements produced exclusively for SPIRIO.

SPIRIOSYNC VIDEO

Crawford also appears in this month’s SPIRIOSYNC video, a performance of “Day Dreaming” live from Steinway Hall, New York. He spoke to us about the music of Aretha Franklin.

Davell_Interview_E1.mp4

WHAT’S NEW

We also explore David Bowie’s music through arrangements by Meral Guneyman, scale the heights of virtuosic pianism with Konstantin Scherbakov, and get a taste of Bollywood music-making with Sunny Choi.

david BOWIE
konstantinSCHERBAKOV
INTERVIEW
BOLLYWOOD

Classical pianists look to Liszt’s 12 Transcendental Etudes as a career achievement, but Konstantin Scherbakov brings his formidable virtuosity not just to these works, but also to a “companion” set of Etudes Sergei Lyapunov wrote to honor Liszt and to complete the cycle, both musically and in degree of difficulty. This monumental group of 24 Transcendental Etudes marks Scherbakov’s SPIRIO debut. Scherbakov spoke to STEINWAY about his recording for SPIRIO and STEINWAY & SONS label.

Meral Guneyman’s new arrangements of classic David Bowie songs are presented on spirio for the first time. “Life on Mars,” “Let’s Dance,” “Space Oddity” and others take new shape when heard on solo piano — familiar yet different, for fans and as a discovery for the unenlightened.

Similarly, the music of Bollywood will be entirely familiar to fans of the genre (of which there are millions), while for others, Sunny Choi’s arrangements of the most popular tunes provide yet another flavor to the SPIRIO experience.

 

explore the MUSIC

Each month we features highlights from the SPIRIO catalog. Learn more about the artists, the history and the music found exclusively on SPIRIO.

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FEBRUARY HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SPIRIO CATALOG

Spirio Spotlight

FEBRUARY HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SPIRIO CATALOG

Steinway & Sons Spirio, the world’s finest high resolution player piano, makes you King of the Oscar Party with our music from movies playlist, featuring new medleys from French pianist–composer Jean-Michel Bernard of works by John Williams, Henry Mancini, Lalo Schifrin, Ennio Morricone and others. In honor of Chinese New Year, we highlight a range of classical and folk music of China, including the recent “Pining for the Spring Breeze” (望春风) from Zhang Chi. There is also new Chinese pop music, including Warren Lee performing Teresa Teng’s “The Moon Represents My Heart” (月亮代表我的心).

SpirioSync Video

One of the truly remarkable pianists of the first half of the 20th century was the great Josef Hofmann. For the first time, Steinway bring his performances to Spirio.

A prolific composer and arranger, Hofmann was from an era of daring creativity. His arrangement of Chopin’s Minute Waltz from a 1938 performance is an excellent example. We have also been able to re-create his 1945 televised performance of Rachmaninov’s C-sharp minor Prelude — extremely rare footage of this artist — for this month’s SpirioSync video.

Whats New

More classical tracks this month come from a future star, 19-year-old Chinese pianist Wei Luo. Her expressive Mozart and Chopin are complemented by the startling virtuosity of her Prokofiev and Shchedrin. And Klara Min continues her exploration of the romantic works of Scriabin with the 2nd Piano Sonata. Antonio Pompa-Baldi brings two classical chestnuts: Paderewski’s Nocturne in B-flat major and Moszkowski’s Virtuosic Etude Op. 72 No. 6., and Natasha Paremski plays jazz great Fred Hersch’s classical work Variations on a theme by Tchaikovsky.

Finally, we have more pop music this month — including a group of vintage 1970s tracks from David Osborne.

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Steinway & Sons Fit & Finish Improvements since 2013 – a photo essay

The first group of improvements concern measures that affect performance, or reduce the amount of musical preparation the pianos need after production — in the factory, by the dealer, or in the field:

Double-pounding
Double-“pounding” to develop hammer tone without lacquer

Problem: New hammers are relatively soft and required saturating with lacquer to harden them before they could be voiced. The use of lacquer in large quantity makes voicing more difficult and the results less predictable.

Solution: Although actions always went through a “pounding” by machine to settle cloth and felt parts, they now go through a second, more forceful pounding to naturally harden the hammer felt before voicing so that little hardening with lacquer is needed. The pianos come out of the factory closer to their final voice, and need less voicing by the technician in the field; and, for the end user, the voicing is more stable over time.

Individual hammer gluing
Individual hammer gluing

Problem: Using a special fixture, hammers were glued to the shanks in groups. This was fast and efficient in the short term, but because hammers slightly shift position as the glue dries, they required a lot of adjusting later on. The twisting and bending of the shanks during this adjustment put potentially damaging pressure on the action parts.

Solution: Hammers are installed individually, just as they would be in a rebuilding shop. This is much more labor-intensive in the short term, but is more accurate and eliminates most of the need for later adjusting.

Institute measures to reduce incidence of sticking dampers
Institute measures to reduce incidence of sticking dampers

Problem: Stainless-steel damper wires sometimes wouldn’t slide freely in the damper guide-rail bushings; dampers would stick in the up position, causing notes to sustain.

Solution: Damper wires are now made of nickel silver, which takes a higher polish than stainless steel, and is more malleable for easier adjustment. They are polished in an ultrasonic cleaner (shown), and the damper guide-rail bushings are impregnated with Teflon powder, which reduces friction to near zero.

Scale-indexed action-part mounting system
Scale-indexed action-part mounting system

Problem: Action parts were screwed to the action frame by hand, resulting in slight variations in the positions of parts on the frame from instrument to instrument. These variations then had to be eliminated by careful adjustment in the factory or the field.

Solution: Action parts and screws are inserted by a machine indexed to the scale of the piano. Installation is uniform and exact, so there is little or no need for adjustment later.

Improved hammer skiving
Improved hammer skiving

Problem: Strips of felt that are to become hammers must first be “skived,” or trimmed, into a pre-hammer shape so that when the strips are bent in the hammer-making molds, the resulting hammers will be of the correct size and shape. This used to be done using unstable wooden fixtures, and resulted in hammer sizes and shapes that varied from instrument to instrument, which required that more hammer filing be done before voicing in the factory or in the field.

Solution: A proprietary skiving machine (not shown) uses CNC technology to shape the felt strips to the exact specifications originally developed for each piano model so that the hammers turn out the same every time. Very little hammer filing is then needed prior to voicing.

Thin high-treble hammershanks
Thin high-treble hammershanks

Problem: Steinway wanted to enhance the tonal sustain in the high treble.

Solution: Thinning the hammershanks of the highest 20 notes to reduce their mass and increase their flexibility allows those hammers to rebound from the strings faster, which increases the volume level of their tonal sustain.

Climate-control action department
Climate-control action department

Problem: Action specifications such as the tightness of action centers and the dimensions of action parts vary slightly with changes in humidity. This contributed to a lack of uniformity among instruments, as well as the need for greater adjustment in the field.

Solution: Humidity control was integrated into the action department’s closed-loop dust-collecting system.

Replace buckskin with Ecsaine
Replace buckskin with Ecsaine

Problem: Buckskin, a natural suede-finished leather made from the hides of deer or sheep, was used in several places in the action where a tough, smooth material is needed, but it varied in thickness and quality from skin to skin. These variations affected critical action dimensions and made a consistent action regulation more difficult.

Solution: Buckskin has been replaced by Ecsaine, a synthetic material with the same tough, suede-like, low-friction properties as buckskin, but which is uniform from batch to batch. Shown here, covered in Ecsaine, are the hammershank knuckles. A side benefit of the change has been reduced action noise.

CNC-machined keybed
CNC-machined keybed

Problem: Although it appears flat to the naked eye, the keybed is actually very slightly curved to optimally fit the key frame, on which the keys move. Planing and sanding the keybed to produce this curvature was done by eye, with much variation from piano to piano. This resulted in additional adjustments in the factory and in the field to properly “bed,” or fit, the key frame to the keybed, and to adjust the key height.

Solution: The keybed is now machined with CNC equipment to ensure greater uniformity from one instrument to the next. Less work is required to bed the key frame, and key height is more uniform.

Adjustable music rack
Adjustable music rack

Problem: The angle of the music rack was fixed and did not suit all players.

Solution: The angle of the music rack can now be adjusted to the player’s preference.

The next group of improvements concern the piano’s appearance:

Rounding of case edges and corners on satin ebony models
Rounding of case edges and corners on satin ebony models

Problem: The sharp edges and corners of the case on satin ebony models didn’t hold the finishing material well, leading, with handling, to premature wearing away of the finish in these areas.

Solution: The corners and edges are now slightly rounded, which better holds the finish and resists wear longer.

Clearcoat case bottoms
Clearcoat case bottoms

Problem: Unfinished case woodworking on the bottom of the piano was hidden by black paint.

Solution: The woodworking on the bottom is nicely finished, and shown off under a clear coat of lacquer.

Improve appearance of trapwork blocks
Improve appearance of trapwork blocks

Problem: Trapwork on the underside of the piano looked rough, and was painted black by brush, which did not create a neat appearance.

Solution: Trapwork blocks are now sanded, given rounded corners, and spray-painted satin black before mounting on the piano.

Satin lustre (semigloss) soundboard finish
Satin lustre (semigloss) soundboard finish

Problem: The high-gloss soundboard varnish showed finish imperfections too easily, and took too much time to cure.

Solution: A satin lustre (semigloss) varnish shows finish imperfections less, looks better, and takes less time to cure, allowing fewer foreign particles to settle in the drying varnish.

High-gloss lacquer finish on fallboard, all models
High-gloss lacquer finish on fallboard, all models

Problem: Over time, the fallboard naturally develops scratches from players’ fingernails. Due to the “grain” of a satin finish, scratches showed up prominently on satin-finished fallboards and were difficult to buff out.

Solution: The fallboard on all models is now finished in high-gloss lacquer. Such a finish has no grain; while it still scratches, the scratches don’t show as much and can be buffed out more easily.

The last group of improvements concern measures taken to reduce the amount of touchup and repair needed after production:

Protective shields during installation of plate screws and bolts
Protective shields during installation of plate screws and bolts

Problem: Plates can get scratched during screw and bolt installation. Plates are difficult to touch up well.

Solution: Protective plate shields made of polystyrene were developed to fit each model. No touchup is required afterward.

Protective “armor” for cases during production

Problem: During stringing and other production work, the case arms, stretcher, and keybed would get scratched and dented, and would have to be touched up at the end of production. Often, the touchup was noticeable as such.

Solution: Plastic “armor,” developed to fit the front end of each instrument, is kept in place during the manufacturing process to minimize scratches and dents. The result is that little or no touchup is required.

Plate protection around tuning pins during stringing
Plate protection around tuning pins during stringing

Problem: The area around the tuning pins can get scratched easily during stringing, and is difficult or impossible to touch up.

Solution: Protective plate shields made of thin sheets of rubber were developed to fit each model. No touchup is required afterward.

Plastic covers to keep strings clean during production
Plastic covers to keep strings clean during production

Problem: Dirt and dust would get into the bass-string windings during production, sometimes resulting in discoloration and tonal impairment.

Solution: To keep dirt and dust out, the pianos are covered with plastic sheeting when not being worked on.

Positive-pressure clean room for soundboard finishing
Positive-pressure clean room for soundboard finishing

Problem: Despite best efforts to keep out dust, invariably it would get into the soundboard varnish as it dried, making for a less-than-perfect finish.

Solution: Create a positive-pressure clean room in which to spray and cure the soundboard varnish, resulting in a near-perfect finish.

 – Larry Fine
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Steinway Spirio Update

Spirio Spotlight

NOVEMBER HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SPIRIO CATALOG

Steinway & Sons Spirio, the world’s finest high resolution player piano, presents jazz headliner Aaron Diehl in a tour-de-force set of short works by Dick Hyman that encompass the heritage of jazz. In just 20 minutes, Diehl (and Hyman) take us from Scott Joplin to Earl Hines, from Fats Waller to Dave Brubeck. Aaron is also featured in two SpirioSync videos:  tributes to George Shearing, and our featured Steinway Immortal, the remarkable Art Tatum.

Tatum’s heavy influence on jazz is well known. Spirio listeners have the privilege of experiencing the man himself through our re-created performances. Indeed, Tatum’s influence is not bounded by jazz — most pianists, irrespective of genre, marvel at his astonishing technique and musicianship.

New & Notable

If you have enjoyed listening to our September featured artist from, Ludovico Einaudi, you’ll want to hear our favorite Belgian pianist Jean-François Maljean, who returns this month with a new set of music that features his engaging blend of jazz and New Age improvisation.

The trailblazing pianist and composer Vijay Iyer takes us to another area of jazz that highlights his diverse creativity that is so admired.

And if you liked Piotr Anderszewski’s taste of Janáček’s On the overgrown path released in September, you will want to hear Czech pianist Ivo Kahánek, who presents the complete First Book of that seminal work.

Japanese pianist Yoko Kikuchi debuts on Spirio with some short works including Mozart’s Kleine Gigue; Jenny Lin plays Sibelius and Philip Glass; and Sunny Choi plays Taylor Swift and Lady Gaga.

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The Steinway Touch

THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACTION MECHANISMS

One day in 1932, Josef Hofmann, the American pianist, composer, and inventor who had already spoken of the STEINWAY’s “extraordinary perfection of action,” came to STEINWAY HALL and said, “It isn’t quick enough. Can’t you make it still more sensitive, still more responsive?”

Hofmann’s challenge was the impetus for STEINWAY to become the most responsive and sensitive of any piano made. Frederick Vietor, grandnephew to C. F. Theodore Steinway, fulfilled Hofmann’s request by creating the STEINWAY ACCELERATED ACTION, enhancing the STEINWAY action to respond to the touch instead of being forced into action. Today, the ACCELERATED ACTION is found on all American-made STEINWAYS.

Laboratory tests have proven that the keys on a STEINWAY can repeat 13% more quickly than any other piano. The same features that allow for this faster repeat also provide a much more sensitive, responsive keyboard, an aspect that can be appreciated even by beginning pianists.

The keys of a STEINWAY are constructed of Bavarian spruce. The quarter-sawn maple action parts are mounted on a STEINWAY METALLIC ACTION FRAME, which consists of seamless brass tubes with rosette-shaped contours, force fitted with maple dowels and brass hangers to assure the stability of the regulation.

RECENT IMPORVEMENTS:

1983 / “Permafree-II” action centres (Emralon-impregnated centre-pin bushings) are introduced. Emralon, the liquid version of teflon, reduces wear and eliminates friction.

1992 / “New York Improved” action geometry (imporved leverage as well as improved manufacturing precision)

2006 / Escaine is introduced on backchecks, knuckles and balanciers for quieter operation of action parts.

2008 / Climate control and daily computer measurement of tolerances are introduced in the action department for making the world’s finest piano action parts.

DOWNLOAD THE FLYER

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New Steinway piano holds keys to UofA student success

 

Master pianist and U of A music professor Jacques Després knows playing on a great piano is key to his talented students giving their best performances. U of A music students have access to renowned instructors and many opportunities to perform, but the concert pianos have aged.

Wear and tear on older pianos changes how they feel and sound, preventing students from playing to their potential. “It’s like listening to music on earbuds with a laptop,” Després says. “The music is there but not at the best possible quality.”

150: Concerts, recitals and master classes presented by the U of A music department this year

311: Students enrolled in music programs at the U of A. Many go on to perform nationally and internationally.

97%: Portion of concert pianists who choose to perform on Steinways

20,000+: Arts lovers who took in U of A music, theatre and design shows in 2017-18, illustrating the university’s impact on the arts community

 

Thanks to a dedicated group of donors, a Steinway Model D concert grand piano made its debut at Convocation Hall this spring. It will be an invaluable learning tool for students.

A Steinway takes more than a year to build and is made almost entirely by hand. “When you play on a piano of this quality, you realize things about the music you would not realize on another piano,” Després says. “You’re not held back by the instrument.”

The new Steinway will enrich Edmonton’s vibrant arts community by attracting more visiting musicians, whose master classes and performances will benefit students and music lovers alike. “It is truly a special instrument,” says Després.

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Steinway’s Accelerated Action™

Did you know? Laboratory tests have proven that the keys on a STEINWAY piano can repeat 13% more quickly than any other piano. The same features that allow for this faster repeat also provide a much more sensitive, responsive keyboard, an aspect that can be appreciated even by beginning pianists.

1) Balanced Rail Bearing

The balance rail bearing, as you can see in the illustration taken from the 1931 patent, is a rounded felt-covered piece of maple, which serves as the fulcrum on which the key pivots. Only STEINWAY incorporates a rounded surface; other brands have flat rail bearings.

Why is a Rounded Surface Important?
Scenario 1: Imagine a long plank balanced on a flat piano bench. It’s easy to place the plank so that it balances. The plank can be moved slightly one way or the other without either end touching the ground.

If you place your hand on one end and press very lightly, the plank might bend a little but the other end will not move. As you gradually press harder, the other end of the plank will eventually move, but only after you have applied considerable pressure.

Scenario 2: Now imagine the same situation but with a round surface on top of the flat bench. In this case the plank moves easily (friction free), and it is somewhat difficult to balance; once balanced, pressure on either end will cause the opposite end to move.

This principle underlies every STEINWAY action. The benefit is that the STEINWAY keys move friction free on the rounded balance rails making for the most responsive action possible.

 2) Weighted Keys

The second distinguishing factor in the touch is the weighting of the keys: Larger weights are placed closer to the balance rail bearing, causing the keys to return faster.

So why doesn’t every piano manufacturer incorporate these features? In one word: Time. Every key found on STEINWAY pianos is individually weighed off — a remarkably time consuming process.

Because the STEINWAY action has a much more sensitive fulcrum than actions of other pianos, all other action-related regulation is also more sensitive. The sensitive fulcrum of a STEINWAYaction increases the complexity of all parts of the action.

STEINWAY, of course, is happy to put in the extra work, especially when the result is the most responsive piano action in the world. As the founding credo states “Build the best piano possible.”

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Piano lessons have greater impact than you can imagine

Our very own Angela Cheng shares her personal relationship with music and the power of its universal language. Piano lessons can have a greater impact than you can imagine!

I was 11 years old and didn’t speak a word of English when we arrived in Edmonton from Hong Kong. I was placed in seventh grade – junior high – while my younger sister went to elementary school with our four cousins. It was lonely. And failing everything except mathematics was heartbreaking.

So I begged my mother for piano lessons. I would love to say that I had been a devoted musician from the time I was four years old – I wasn’t. But I think I knew that when I couldn’t communicate with words, I could with music. And that music would help me feel some kind of connection, some continuity.

But it was a hard time for my family. My mom was a school principal in Hong Kong, but she gave that up to come to Canada and work in a factory so my sister and I could have a better future. Even so, she found a way to get me those lessons.

Every Saturday, I took several buses to get to Alberta College on the south side for my piano lesson. I’d spend the whole day there practicing, and then my teacher would drive me home. On Sunday it was the same thing, but we were placed in chamber groups. I remember playing in a trio and with a violinist and a cellist, even though I couldn’t speak English. It didn’t matter because music really is a universal language. Those are very happy memories for me.

I’m so grateful to my mother for finding a way for me to take those lessons, and for bringing us to Canada. I’m also grateful to the people of Edmonton. After a determined music teacher convinced me that music – not medicine – should be my life’s work, a group of Edmonton women set up a scholarship for me. They created a foundation and held bake sales, raffles, bingos, book sales – you name it – to raise enough money to send me to Juilliard in New York.

I know that everything I do is possible because of the people who supported me along the way. I live and teach in Ohio now, but Edmonton is my home. Every time I get a chance to play here, I treasure it. 

— Angela Cheng, former Alberta College Conservatory student

Angela is an orchestral soloist, recitalist and chamber musician. She has appeared with more than 100 orchestras around the world and is known for her remarkable technique, tonal beauty and insightful musicianship.

Angela is playing a concert at MacEwan on June 2 in celebration of the Muttart Foundation’s 65th Anniversary. Email conservatory@macewan.ca for more information or to order tickets.

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